Pet Insurance

sick doggyIn the vast majority of households, our pets are considered members of the family. Unlike their human family, pets cost money to care for, as there is no pet public health system. Technology and advancements in veterinary science have increased the options available for treatment. Your vet may even wish to refer your pet onto a specialist. All this comes with increased costs.

Being a responsible pet owner requires regular preventative health care, and making difficult decisions at times of unexpected accidents or illness. Owners want to be able to pay whatever is necessary to make their pet well in the best possible way, but realistically this can put them in financial difficulty. When a decision has to be made, it’s not always easy to go with the ideal option. Setting aside money or building up a credit at your veterinary clinic can be very useful but injuries or illness often happen before you’ve saved enough.

Pet insurance is worth considering to help smooth the costs associated with caring for your furry family, and there are several companies offering pet insurance in NZ.

There are two mains types of cover available; comprehensive and surgery-only. Surgery-only cover will only contribute towards the surgical costs of your pet’s illness or injury. This can be a cost-effective way to meet unexpected surgical costs, but it is important to note that most policies have an annual maximum limit that can be claimed on particular procedures.

Comprehensive cover will contribute towards both any surgery caused by accident or illness as well as associated medical costs. Some policies cover routine vaccinations and annual health checks.

It’s important to assess exclusions and limitations related to age, breed and pre-existing conditions that may relate to your pet.

Ultimately the right pet insurance for you will depend on your budget, the type of pets you have and the level of cover you wish to be insured for. As with all insurance though, the best advice is to take your time, shop around and always read the fine print.