Tooth Truths

catdogBy the age of just three years, up to 70% of cats and 80% of dogs have signs of dental disease. An unhealthy mouth can cause bad breath, chronic pain, reduced quality of life, and can even lead to heart, kidney or liver disease.

Unfortunately pets can’t tell us that their teeth or mouth hurt. Dental disease is not always easy to detect, as lesions can develop under the gum line, and animals can change their eating behaviour and food preferences to avoid pain. Sometimes changes in behaviour, such as pet becoming grumpy may be the only sign something is wrong. As a result many cases of oral disease escape detection and pets suffer in silence.

Obvious signs that your pet may have a problem and require a vet visit include bad breath, facial swellings, dribbling or drooling, having difficulty eating or going off their food, weight loss, pawing or rubbing their mouth, or lack of grooming. However, the presence of dental tartar and reddening of the gums with no other signs is enough to suggest that your pet may need a dental.

Dental care such as brushing, dental diets, and chews are useful before problems develop, and after their teeth have been cleaned. None of these measures will help an animal with advanced dental disease. Prevention and early detection of dental disease is more cost effective and safer for your pet, rather than lengthy anaesthetics and tooth extractions as dental disease progresses.

Dental care is an important part of maintaining your pet’s overall good health and we are committed to helping you achieve the healthiest life possible for your furry friend. Regular dental checks can help make sure your pets mouth stays in excellent health. Your pet may need to be scheduled for a dental procedure, or maintained at-home with specialised dental diets, dental chews or toys, teeth brushing or additives for their drinking water. Give us a call to arrange an appointment to check your pet’s teeth.